The Collection: Anxiety

This week’s 99-word (no more, no less) writing prompt over at Carrot Ranch http://www.carrotranch.com was to write a story about anxiety and how the subject might affect or move along the story.

This pedometer geek writer wrote the following:

The Boards

Five years of schooling came down to this: the boards. Julia knew that she’d studied hard, especially math, her biggest worry, but she also knew that some of the smartest students failed in their first attempt passing the tests covering all the knowledge the university taught.

The night before she was reviewing some material when she realized she didn’t know anything about Kayexelate. It was a random question on the practice materials, yet suddenly, her anxiety level climbed into the stratosphere.

Panic set in, but Julia called her tutor, who calmed her down.

 The next day, the exams began. 

~Nancy Brady, 2022

To read all of the stories about the subject, check out the Anxiety Collection over at http://www.carrotranch.com . There are some excellent stories, expressing the subject, this week. Considering the subject of anxiety, some are even humorous.

About pedometergeek

A pharmacist by profession, a haiku poet by nature, I read and write. I have a book of haiku, Ohayo Haiku, and another somewhat alternative haiku book, Three Breaths, but write other genres. I also read...lots of novels! My favorite is, and remains, Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged but I am also a big Harry Potter fan. I truly am a pedometer geek strapping on my pedometer as soon as I awaken.
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2 Responses to The Collection: Anxiety

  1. Jules says:

    Oh… I looked that ‘word’ up. So… many things to keep track up. Glad Julia had a good tutor.

    Liked by 1 person

    • What? Kayexelate? Yeah, this medication takes excess potassium out of the body. The funny thing is in all the time I was practicing, I think I only recall seeing only one or two times it was even prescribed by a physician. It is used more often in the hospital
      setting.
      Speaking for myself, I didn’t ever remember learning about the medication during any class until the night before I was scheduled to take the exam. Fortunately, learning about it then helped me answer multiple questions about it on almost every section of the boards except for the law portion. I guess that’s why I chose to use that drug name when I wrote Julia’s story. I am sure I wasn’t the only pharmacy graduate who missed that during lectures and was surprised by its use on the tests.

      Liked by 1 person

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